European Institute for Asian Studies
What is Ahead for China’s Financial System? Implications for Europe
  • Start03:30 PM - Mar 27 2018
  • End05:30 PM - Mar 27 2018
  • Asia Platform, Rue de la Loi 26, 10th floor, 1040 Brussels
  • 02 230 81 22
  • eias@eias.org
Download Tim Ruhlig’s Power Point Presentation

 

Programme

 

15:00-15:30

15:30-15:40

Registration

Introduction by the Chair

Mr Erik Famaey, Senior Associate, European Institute for Asian Studies (EIAS)

15:40-16:45

Panel Discussion

 

Mr Tim Rühlig, Visiting Fellow, European Institute for Asian Studies (EIAS); PhD Candidate, Goethe University of Frankfurt

Mr Rupert Willis, Economist (China), Directorate-General for Economic and Financial Affairs, European Commission

Mr Jochen Robert Elsen, Legal Adviser, Financial Stability and Regulation, Federal Financial Supervisory Authority of Germany

16:45-17:30

17:30

Q&A

Networking Reception

What is Ahead for China’s Financial System? Implications for Europe

This panel discussion will bring together academic experts as well as practitioners to discuss current challenges and changes of China’s financial system. The aim is to provide a better understanding of risks as well as potentials of the Chinese financial system and provide a platform to exchange different points of view and suggestions for future European-Chinese cooperation in this field.

 

Most recently, concerns of a potential Chinese financial crisis are looming large in both China and Europe. These fears are fueled by reports of rising indebtedness, a real-estate bubble, non-performing loans handed out to “zombie” firms, and more fundamental structural challenges arising from the “new normal” and supply-side economic reforms.

 

China has started to undertake reforms in the financial sector not least in the wake of RMB internationalization, the RMB’s inclusion into the IMF’s currency basket of special drawing rights, and the facilitation of more efficient resource allocation in times of the new normal. In addition, China seems to strive for a decoupling from the US financial system including the Dollar which bears the potential for a further a deepening cooperation between Europe and China in this field.

 

In Europe, though, experts still struggle to assess Chinese reforms and the future plans in the field of finance. Since the allocation of funds is of paramount importance for the macro-economy, Chinese reforms may very well determine the future growth model and potentials of the PRC’s economy. A Chinese financial crisis, in turn, would carry massive negative consequences for the European economy. How far-reaching are the reforms? What lies ahead? What does it imply for China’s economic future and the prospects for EU-China economic cooperation?

 

On a more general note, an increasing concern of Chinese engagement in EU member states and neighborhood is widespread in Europe. Uncertainty about China’s policies and plans contribute to this suspicion. Even the Chinese announcement that foreign banks will be permitted to purchase majority shares of Chinese financial institutions within the next 3-5 years has not led to widespread enthusiasm in Europe: What do European policy-makers and businesses have to look for to get a proper understanding of Chinese financial policies and take reasonable decisions? Should European banks make use of the newly increased investment opportunities? Is there more room for cooperation in the field of financial regulation?

 

These are the core issues that this panel discussion aims to address in order to facilitate a better understanding of risks, potentials and reforms of the Chinese financial system and its regulation.


This panel discussion will bring together academic experts as well as practitioners to discuss current challenges and changes of China’s financial system. The aim is to provide a better understanding of risks as well as potentials of the Chinese financial system and provide a platform to exchange different points of view and suggestions for future European-Chinese cooperation in this field.



European Institute for Asian Studies

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