European Institute for Asian Studies
Towards a Low Carbon Future in ASEAN: EU-Japan Cooperation
  • Start04:00 PM - Dec 14 2016
  • End06:00 PM - Dec 14 2016
  • Asia Platform, Rue de la Loi 26, 10th floor, 1040 Brussels
  • + 32 2 230 81 22
  • alberto.turkstra@eias.org

Programme

15:30-16:00

Registration

16:00-16:10

Introduction by the Chair

 

Mr Erik Famaey, Senior Associate, European Institute for Asian Studies (EIAS)

16:10-17:30

Panel  Discussion

Mr Ruud Kempener, Policy Officer, DG Energy, European  Commissino

Mr Yoshihide Hirao, First Secretary, Mission of Japan to the EU

Mr Ernesto Bonafe, Trade Expert, Energy Charter

Mr Ralph Vincent Abarquez, Second Secretary and Consul, Mission of the Philippines to the EU

Mr Oji Hitomi, President & Managing Director, Sumitomo Benelux S.A./N.V. 

Ms Noriko Fujiwara, Associate Research Fellow, Centre for European Policy Studies (CEPS) 

17:30-18:00

Q&A

18:00

Networking reception

Towards a Low Carbon Future in ASEAN: EU-Japan Cooperation

At last year’s COP 21 meeting in Paris, the international community agreed that substantial progress has been made since the widely criticised COP15. A constructiveagreement between developing and developed countries has finally been achieved. Developing countries that lack the resources either to develop sustainable energy or to educate specialists are in need of technological diffusion from countries with sophisticated energy generation technologies. At COP22, an inclusive dialogue was provided to allow every member the opportunity to participate in setting goals and boundaries. In addition, all necessary preparations are scheduled to be completed by the time COP24 takes place in 2018. ASEAN, a market with an incredibly high paced increase in consumer demand, requires international cooperation in order to establish an energy policy that can cope with its expansion. Although the EANET (East Asian Acid Rain Network) regional cooperation framework on climate change led by Japan has largely contributed to monitor pollution issues, it seems insufficient in creating a low carbon driven society. The EU on the other hand, driven by Germany and Denmark in particular, has achieved results on developing and exporting technology on renewable energy both inside and outside its domestic markets.

Both the EU and Japan are well known for their respective high technology levelsin the energy generation industry. The EU is host to the most advanced renewable energy R&D centres, while Japan has the capacity to provide large scale production of the necessary technology. Furthermore, Japan is ideally located in its proximity to the ASEAN region. How and in what form can synergies be obtainedfrom a possible technological cooperation between the EU and Japan, in order to provide ASEAN countries with the necessary tools to switch from a fossil fuelled economy towards renewable energy?

The European Institute for Asian Studies is honoured to host panel members from various sectors in order to discuss concrete concepts on how mutual cooperation can proceed, based on the Paris agreement.


How and in what form can synergies be obtained from a possible technological cooperation between the EU and Japan, in order to provide ASEAN countries with the necessary tools to switch from a fossil fuel economy towards renewable energy?



European Institute for Asian Studies

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