European Institute for Asian Studies
Nepal-EU Cooperation: Unlocking Nepal's Hydropower Potential
  • Start02:30 PM - Jun 28 2016
  • End04:00 PM - Jun 28 2016
  • Asia Platform, Rue de la Loi 26, 10th floor, 1000 Brussels
  • +32 2 230 81 22
  • alberto.turkstra@eias.org


Programme

14:00-14:30 Registration
14:30-14:40 Welcome Remarks
Mr Ghanshyam Bhandari, Charge D’Affaires, Embassy of Nepal in Brussels
14:40-14:50 Introduction by the Chair
Dr Alexander Spachis, Senior Associate, EIAS
14:50-15:30 Panel Discussion
Mr Ramon Ynaraja, Loan Officer – Asia Division, European Investment Bank (EIB)

Prof. Em. Han Verschure, KU Leuven

Prof. Dr. Thierry Lefèvre, Consortium Project Team Leader, Project Manager and Key Expert Asia, EU Technical Assistance Facility (EU TAF) for SE4ALL Initiative for Neighbourhood, Asia, Latin America, Caribbean and Pacific

15:30-16:00 Q&A

Nepal-EU Cooperation: Unlocking Nepal’s Hydropower Potential

The world’s second richest country in inland water resources with as many as 6,000 rivers and tributaries, Nepal can meet not just its own electricity needs, but also serve energy deficient neighbours like Bangladesh and India. With over 90 percent of the country’s total electricity generation capacity generated by hydropower plants, hydropower plays an important role in Nepal’s economic future because of the scale of its potential.

Nepal’s rivers and topography provide ideal conditions for the development of hydropower. The country’s hydropower potential is estimated to be of approximately 40,000 MW, whereas the actual electricity generation from hydropower in Nepal is currently 800 MW from 20 major hydropower plants and a number of small hydropower plants.

If such a potential is realized, Nepal could become the battery of South Asia. Domestically, hydropower could create opportunities for domestic growth and development, creating jobs, enhancing income levels and help people lift themselves out of poverty. At the same time, other sources of renewable energy, including solar power, will experience a significant growth in the coming years and will need to be connected to the national grid. Indeed, the lack of access to reliable, grid‐supplied electricity is a key constraint to economic growth and an obstacle to reducing poverty.

This seminar will bring together relevant stakeholders, such as the European Investment Bank (that granted a EUR 55 million loan to Nepal to finance the construction of the Tanahu Hydropower Plant) to discuss how Nepal can maximize benefits from its rich natural resource endowment in a sustainable way; the policy options are available to attract further domestic and international financing; and in particular investment opportunities for EU companies and  the role of EU technology, expertise and know-how.

Download Mr Ramon Ynaraja’s Power Point Presentation Download Prof. Em. Han Verschure’s Power Point Presentation

This seminar will bring together relevant stakeholders, such as the European Investment Bank and the European Commission, to discuss how Nepal can maximize benefits from its rich natural resource endowment in a sustainable way; and in particular investment opportunities for EU companies and the role of EU technology, expertise and know-how.

Download Report


European Institute for Asian Studies

Our mailing list