European Institute for Asian Studies
Four Years of the Belt and Road Initiative: Perspectives from Europe
  • Start04:00 PM - Sep 12 2017
  • End06:00 PM - Sep 12 2017
  • Asia Platform, Rue de la Loi 26, 10th floor, 1040 Brussels
  • + 32 2230 81 22
  • alberto.turkstra@eias.org

Programme

15:30-16:00

Registration

16:00-16:10

Introduction by the Chair

Mr Axel Goethals, CEO, European Institute for Asian Studies (EIAS)
16:10-16:30

Keynote Addresses

H.E. Mr Kris Peeters, Deputy Prime Minister, Government of Belgium

Mr MU Yongpeng, Counsellor,Political Department, Mission of the People’s Republic of China to the EU

 16:30-16:40

Presentation of EIAS Research on the Belt and Road Initiative

Mr Hannes Dekeyser, Programme Coordinator, European Institute for Asian Studies (EIAS)

16:40-17:30

Panel Discussion

 

Dr Jing Men, Director, EU-China Research Centre, College of Europe

Mr Luigi Gambardella, President, ChinaEU

Dr Matthieu Burnay, Lecturer in Global Law and Chinese Law, Queen Mary University of London

17:15-18:00

18:00

Q&A

Networking Reception

Four Years of the Belt and Road Initiative: Perspectives from Europe

China’s Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) has been received with great interest ever since its launch in 2013. The project is to better connect the Eurasian continent through the development of infrastructure and energy projects. It is to become an inclusive initiative to the benefit of all along the Belt and Road. Now, a number of years running, the BRI is taking shape and an increasing number of projects are being implemented. Governments of host countries and international organisations seem to agree on the relevance of such a grand initiative. Given the huge gap of infrastructure investment in developing areas, it is very much timely, and it comes as no surprise that many governments are welcoming China’s investments. Paradoxically, however, running almost parallel to increased Chinese investments is an increase of Sinophobia and public discontent in host countries. A large majority seems to agree on the necessity of investment, yet the means by which China enters host countries seems to strengthen a sense of distrust and even protectionism.

This seminar will discuss the state of play of China’s Belt and Road Initiative, including an assessment of the reasons behind the paradoxical public discontent towards Chinese investments in host countries, and means to strengthen people-to-people exchanges, R&D cooperation and other soft areas of cooperation (culture, education, etc…). For this occasion, the European Institute for Asian Studies will furthermore present the outcomes of its policy paper OBOR and China-EU Cooperation: Opportunities and Challenges for Europe.

 


This seminar will discuss the state of play of China’s Belt and Road Initiative, including an assessment of the reasons behind the paradoxical public discontent towards Chinese investments in host countries, and means to strengthen people-to-people exchanges, R&D cooperation and other soft areas of cooperation (culture, education…).

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