European Institute for Asian Studies
Formulating a Response to Fake News: Regulation and Accountability
  • Start12:30 PM - May 14 2018
  • End02:30 PM - May 14 2018
  • Asia Platform, Rue de la Loi 26, 10th floor, 1040 Brussels
  • 02 230 81 22
  • eias@eias.org

 

Programme

 

11:30-12:30

Registration and Networking Lunch

12:30-12:45

Introduction by the Chair

 

Mr Mark Wells, Lecturer, University of East Anglia

12:45-13:45

Panel Discussion

 

Prof. Olivier Arifon, Senior Associate, European Institute for Asian Studies (EIAS)

Mr Alexandre Alaphilippe, Vice President, EU DisinfoLab

Prof. Ike Picone, Assistant professor of Journalism and Media Studies, Department of Communication Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB) 

Mr Christophe Leclercq, Founder, EURACTIV

13:45-14:30

Q&A


Formulating a Response to Fake News: Regulation and Accountability

As new, digital platforms have helped bring about the innovation of traditional journalistic practices, the simultaneous rise of fake news and the spread of disinformation throughout new forms of media has left journalism in a state of flux. This issue however, has implications far beyond the undermining of new and traditional media sources. It is becoming increasingly clear that this spread of fake news has had a significant impact upon elections throughout the world, and resultingly, throughout the past year, the subject of addressing this contentious issue has entered the political mainstream.

Whilst consensus exists regarding the damaging nature of fake news, especially upon democratic systems, the international community seems as far away as ever from developing a unified mechanism to combat it. Debate rages concerning whose responsibility it is to confront fake news, and whether the regulation or criminalisation of these practices represents an infringement upon the freedom of the press.

With the health of numerous political systems being threatened, national governments have struggled to formulate any coherent method of engagement. Many governments are looking to establish regulatory frameworks which they hope will ensure journalistic rigour, whilst Malaysia has recently criminalised fake news, with the spreading of misleading media sources being punishable with up to six years in jail. In response to these attempts to stem the flow of disinformation however, many have argued that greater regulation of the media represents a greater threat to our political systems than fake news does.

This being the case; will the regulation of fake news infringe upon the freedom of the press? To what extent are social media platforms responsible for limiting the spread of fake news? Should this issue be addressed at a corporate, state, or multilateral level? Will others follow Malaysia’s lead in criminalising fake news?


As new, digital platforms have helped bring about the innovation of traditional journalistic practices, the simultaneous rise of fake news and the spread of disinformation throughout new forms of media has left journalism in a state of flux. This issue however, has implications far beyond the undermining of new and traditional media sources.



European Institute for Asian Studies

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