European Institute for Asian Studies
Collateral Damage: How Brexit Affects Japanese Financial Services in Europe
  • Start04:00 PM - Mar 06 2018
  • End06:00 PM - Mar 06 2018
  • Asia Platform, Rue de la Loi 26, 10th floor, 1040 Brussels
  • 02 230 81 22
  • eias@eias.org
Download Jutaro Kaneko’s Keynote Address Download Jutaro Kaneko’s Power Point Presentation Download Esther Widmer’s Power Point Presentation Download Alastair Sutton’s Report “Negotiating Brexit: The Legal Landscape”

Programme

15:30-16:00

16:00-16:10

Registration

Introduction by the Chair

Mr Erik Famaey, Senior Associate, European Institute for Asian Studies (EIAS)

16:10-16:30

Keynote Address

 

Mr Jutaro Kaneko, Chief Representative in Brussels, Japan Center for International Finance

16:30-17:15

Panel Discussion

Ms Esther Widmer, First Secretary, Mission of Switzerland to the EU

Mr George Zavvos, Adviser on European Affairs to the President of New Democracy

Mr Alastair Sutton, Barrister, Brick Court Chambers

17:15-18:00

18:00

Q&A

Networking reception

Collateral Damage: How Brexit Affects Japanese Financial Services in Europe

The Brexit saga is proceeding at a snail’s pace. The UK and the EU member states are desperately searching for wins in what is basically a lose-lose situation.  Both sides are estimating the cost to their economy of different Brexit scenarios. Amidst the tension there is little attention for the harmful effects that Brexit has on the interests of non EU-member countries. 

Japan has voiced its concerns in a government memo issued shortly after the referendum.  It listed general as well as specific requests with respect to the various Japanese business sectors dealing with the EU and the UK.  As to the financial sector Japan asked for “maintaining the freedom of establishment and the provision of financial services, including the ‘single passport’ system”.

As the Brexit clock ticks, and with no sign of progress on the Japanese wish, this seminar highlights the difficulties faced by Japanese financial institutions as they try to cope with the uncertainties of Brexit. It brings perspectives from other stakeholders and an opportunity to exchange views on the future of financial services offered to the EU by non-EU banks.


As the Brexit clock ticks, and with no sign of progress on the Japanese wish, this seminar highlights the difficulties faced by Japanese financial institutions as they try to cope with the uncertainties of Brexit. It brings perspectives from other stakeholders and an opportunity to exchange views on the future of financial services offered to the EU by non-EU banks.



European Institute for Asian Studies

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