European Institute for Asian Studies
China's Future: the China Model and the West
  • Start03:00 PM - Jul 06 2016
  • End06:00 PM - Jul 06 2016
  • China Cultural Center, Rue Philippe Le Bon 2, 1000 Brussels
  • +32 2230 81 22
  • alberto.turkstra@eias.org

Programme

14:30 – 15:00   Registration and discovery visit to the current Exhibition “NEW CHINA Contemporary Chinese Porcelain” in the Centre

15:00 – 15:10   Opening Remarks

H.E. QU Xing, Chinese Ambassador to Belgium

15:10 – 15:40   Keynote Speech

Prof. Dr. ZHANG Weiwei, Director of the Institute of China Studies, Fudan University, Author of the best seller in China The China Wave: Rise of a Civilizational State

15:40 – 16:05   Keynote Speech

Mr. Martin JACQUES, Author of the global best-seller When China Rules the World: the End of the Western World and the Birth of a New Global

16:05 – 16:20   Tea & Coffee Break @ CCC Glass Lobby

16:20 – 17:20   Panel Discussion

Moderated by Ms. Shada Islam, Director of Policy at Friends of Europe

– Prof. Dr. ZHANG Weiwei, Director of the Institute of China Studies, Fudan University, Author of the best seller in China The China Wave: Rise of a Civilizational State

– Mr Martin JACQUES, Author of the global best-seller “When China Rules the World: The End of the Western World and the Birth of a New Global Order”

– Ms Laurence VANDEWALLE, Policy Analyst, European Parliament’s DG External Policies

– Em. Prof. Dr. Sylvain PLASSCHAERT, Advisory Board Member of the European Institute for Asian Studies (EIAS) and the European Centre on International and Political Economy (ECIPE), former Professor of Economics at University of Antwerp and KU Leuven

17:20 – 17:30   Q&A Session

17:30 – 18:00   Networking drinks @ CCC Glass Lobby

Event Introduction

It has always been a widespread notion amongst international observers that, for China to get a legitimate status of developed nation on the international level, it would sooner or later have to go through a major reform of its government, relinquishing its old single-party system for a liberal democracy. However, after more than 65 years with the single-party run socialist republic at its head, China seems no closer to adopting liberal democracy today than it was 30 years ago.

Asserting the legitimacy of its own political system, which has continuously proven very efficient in driving the country socially and economically ever forward, China has been performing better over the last decades than most liberal democracies, especially in domains of great concern to most Chinese people, such as eradicating poverty. At the same time, liberal democracies around the world find themselves in protracted trouble after the Great Recession, from spiralling debt to never ending post-crisis austerity measures, which challenged the Washington Consensus and its doctrine that a combination of liberal democracy and market-led economy are the optimal way ahead.

The so-called China Model, also referred to as the Beijing Consensus, selects meritocratic leaders based on experience and knowledge without American-style political gridlock or susceptibility to populist approval, and it appeals to developing countries worldwide. Although it has no distinct definition and is being discussed in academic circles in China and the West, the model is said to strike the balance between economic growth and political stability, drawing upon pragmatism, gradualism and a significant role of the state in economic development. Critics however argue that despite its undeniably outstanding results in terms of economic and social development, the China Model would lack a moral appeal and be difficult to sustain. However, also liberal democracy has its own demons to deal with, such as short-termism, single-minded populism, excessive influence of money, and influence of special interests.

This first CHINA TALK will discuss the concept and characteristics of the China Model, in an attempt to answer several outstanding issues. Would liberal democracy even be structurally compatible with China, the world’s most populous nation? If political meritocracy is indeed the right model for China, how can China avoid the disadvantages inherent to such a system? And how can political meritocracy best be combined with democracy?

The European Institute for Asian Studies (EIAS) is a partner to this event, which is organised and hosted by the China Cultural Centre, Atlas International Culture, the Institute of China Studies at Fudan University and the Shanghai Municipal Administration of Culture, Radio, Film and TV. Contact news@atlasinternationalculture.com in case of any enquiries.


This seminar will discuss the concept and characteristics of the China Model, in an attempt to answer several outstanding issues. Would liberal democracy be structurally compatible with China, the world’s most populous nation? If political meritocracy is indeed the right model for China, how can China avoid the disadvantages inherent to such a system? And how can political meritocracy best be combined with democracy?



European Institute for Asian Studies

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