European Institute for Asian Studies
Brexit and the Future of EU-Japan Relations
  • Start04:00 PM - Oct 26 2016
  • End06:00 PM - Oct 26 2016
  • Asia Platform, Rue de la Loi 26, 10th floor, 1040 Brussels
  • + 32 2 230 81 22
  • alberto.turkstra@eias.org

»Brexit and the Future of EU-Japan Relations«

Expert exchange with

H.E. Mr. Takanori UEHARA, Mission of Japan to the EU

Prof. Paul BACON; Waseda University

Prof. Hidetoshi NAKAMURA; Waseda University

Mr Tetsuro FUKUNAGA; Executive Director, Japan Machinery Centre for Trade & Investment

Moderator:  Mr. Erik FAMAEY, Senior Associate, European Institute for Asian Studies

Wednesday, 26 October 2016, 16h00 – 18h00

A reception will follow

Venue: European Institute for Asian Studies (EIAS)

Rue de la Loi 26, 10th Floor, 1040 Brussels

Following the Brexit vote, the Japanese government became the first to formally weigh into the upcoming Brexit negotiations, releasing a 15-page memo. Particularly because Britian is the gateway for Japanese investments to the EU single market, Japan requested the UK “respond in a responsible manner to minimise any harmful effects on these businesses.” Approximately one third of Japan’s direct investment into the EU has traditionally flowed through the UK. More than 1,000 Japanese firms have invested in the UK, including major engineering and technology firms such as Hitachi and Fujitsu.

The Brexit vote will not only affect Japanese firms that have invested in the UK as a hub of operations in the European market but adds to the already high degree of uncertainty over sluggish global growth. Furthermore, Brexit comes at a crucial moment in Japan-EU relations, at a time when the bilateral free trade agreement has a high chance of being sealed in the coming months, as leaders from both sides have indicated. But as the UK was considered as one of the biggest supporters of the FTA, what will be the impact of Brexit on the likelihood of negotiations being concluded this year?


Brexit comes at a crucial moment in Japan-EU relations, at a time when the bilateral free trade agreement has a high chance of being sealed in the coming months, as leaders from both sides have indicated. But as the UK was considered as one of the biggest supporters of the FTA, what will be the impact of Brexit on the likelihood of negotiations being concluded this year?



European Institute for Asian Studies

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