European Institute for Asian Studies
Beyond Fake News: The Media in the Age of Post-Truth Politics
  • Start05:00 PM - May 17 2017
  • End06:30 PM - May 17 2017
  • Asia Platform, Rue de la Loi 26, 10th floor, 1040 Brussels
  • + 32 2 230 81 22
  • alberto.turkstra@eias.org

Programme

16:30-17:00

17:00-17:15

Registration

Introduction by the Chair

Ms Clare Precey, Lecturer in media and broadcast journalism, University of East Anglia

17:15-18:00

Panel Discussion

 

Prof Olivier Arifon, Senior Associate, European Institute for Asian Studies (EIAS)

Mr Jonathan Millins, Head of Office, East of England Brussels Bureau

Mr Lieven Taillie, President, Belgian section of the Association of European Journalists (AEJ)

Mr Max von Abendroth, Executive Director, European Magazine Media Association (EMMA)

Mr Nawab Khan, Correspondent, Kuwait News Agency (KUNA)

18:00-18:30

18:30

Discussion and Q&A

Networking reception

Beyond Fake News: The Media in the Age of Post-Truth Politics

In late 2016, Oxford Dictionaries announced that “post-truth” had been chosen as the 2016 word of the year, defining it as a condition “in which objective facts are less influential in shaping public opinion than appeals to emotion and personal belief.” The two key events of 2016 – Brexit and the election of Donald Trump – signal a dark moment for the press, leaving many around the world deeply alarmed. The rise of fake news, attacks on the media by the administration of Donald Trump, have created a uniquely perilous time for journalism. Some argue that journalism is in danger of being overwhelmed by rogue, populistic politics and a communications revolution (ie the rise of social media) that accelerates the spread of lies, misinformation and dubious claims.

 

Populist politicians in the post-truth era appeal to emotions. Such messages spread quickly through social media, which offer a quick way to convey one-sided information or opinions, without the option or capability to verify the authenticity of this information, as opposed to traditional media which aims at presenting and contrasting opposing opinions. Besides, hundreds of “fake news” websites have emerged. With these websites and social media tools multiplying, it seems that the flow of fake news is unstoppable.

 

In this context, what can mainstream media organisations do? How do they maintain people’s trust and credibility? How can mainstream media use social media tools to defend the truth, present the correct information and balance opinions?


The two key events of 2016 – Brexit and the election of Donald Trump – signal a dark moment for the press, leaving many around the world deeply alarmed. The rise of fake news, attacks on the media by the administration of Donald Trump, have created a uniquely perilous time for journalism.



European Institute for Asian Studies

Our mailing list